Category Archives: Lamb

Lamb & Date Tagine with Saffron Almond Couscous

I find that this recipe works equally well for a celebratory feast with guests as it does as a comforting meal with the family.  I’d not call this an easy recipe, but neither is it complex.  It is, however, rather time-consuming. This recipe was originally shared with me by my friend, Chef Pippa Calland, and now I am pleased to share it with you.

Lamb and Date Tagine

Ingredients:

  • 2 pounds boned lamb shoulder (bones reserved), cut into cubes
  • kosher salt
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 large yellow onions, finely diced
  • 1 thick slice (or two) of fresh ginger
  • 2 tsp. freshly ground cinnamon
  • cayenne pepper
  • 2 quarts chicken stock, preferably homemade or low sodium
  • 4 oz. sliced, dried dates, preferably Medjool
  • 1 bunch cilantro, picked, stems reserved, washed, dried and sliced
  • 1 bunch parsley (flat), picked, washed, dried and sliced

Instructions:

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F; when it is hot, place the reserved lamb bones in a cast iron skillet (or other heavy-duty pan or tray) and drizzle lightly with extra virgin olive oil.  Roast until boned become golden and caramelized.  Remove from the oven and set aside.
Season the lamb cubes abundantly with Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper.  Heat a large skillet on medium flame.  When the pan is warm, add a scant amount of olive oil to the pan and allow to heat.  When the oil is warm add the lamb to the pan to brown.  Be careful not to overcrowd the pan (or the meat will steam rather than sear). Repeat as needed until all the lamb has been browned.  Pour off the oil and discard. Put the pan back on the flame and add a scant amount of fresh oil to the pan and heat gently.  Add the chopped onions to the pan and use a wooden spoon to scrape up any caramelized meat juices combining them with the onions.  Cook the onions over a low flame until the just begin to brown and then remove them from the pan.
Heat the chicken broth to a simmer.  Place the lamb, lamb bones, onions, and ginger in a cazuela (a clay cooking pot, Spanish in origin) or tagine pan* and sprinkle with the freshly ground cinnamon and cayenne to taste. Add reserved cilantro stems and enough warm chicken broth to cover the lamb.  Simmer, covered tightly, until the lamb is completely tender, about an hour and a half, adding more chicken stock and turning as needed.
When the meat is cooked, add the dates. Cook the tagine for an additional 15 minutes.  Reduce the sauce to the desired consistency. Add reserved cinnamon to taste and garnish with parsley and cilantro.
Serve with couscous and a big fruit-forward Greek or Lebanese red wine.
Saffron Almond Couscous
Ingredients:
  • 1 yellow onion, finely diced
  • extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 cups Israeli couscous
  • 2 quarts chicken stock, simmered
  • 6 threads saffron
  • unsalted butter
  • Kosher salt
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup oil-toasted, salted, blanched almonds
  • cilantro and parsley, washed, dried, and sliced

Instructions:

Place a large, heavy gauge skillet on the stove and heat until warm.  Add enough oil to abundantly cover the bottom of the pan and heat gently.  When the skillet is warm, add the chopped onion and sweat it over a low flame until soft and opaque – about 15 minutes.  When the onion is ready, turn up the flame and add the couscous.  Toast the couscous over a high flame, stirring continuously, until it is a homogenous golden color and well-toasted.

Add the saffron to the couscous and ladle in enough warm chicken stock to cover by 1/4 inch. Season with salt and pepper.  Stir to ensure the couscous doesn’t stick to the bottom.  Turn the flame to low.  Cover the pan with a lid or parchment and cook until the stock has been completely absorbed.  Add more stock until the couscous becomes completely tender and then remove from the heat.

Add butter to moisten and season the couscous.  Check the seasonings and correct as needed.  Just before serving, add the almonds, cilantro and parsley.  Stir gently to combine.  Enjoy!!

 

*cook’s note – Sadly I have no clay cooking pots, but my heavy Calphalon skillet proves to work very well.
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Filed under Difficulty - Sous Chef, Dinner, Lamb, Mediterranean

Yes, even YOU can make haggis


As we prepare to celebrate Robert Burns in the Steamlands of Second Life™ on January 22, 2011 (as noted in my personal blog), I wanted to share with you both a traditional Scottish haggis recipe as well as a modern haggis recipe in the event that you would enjoy celebrating the Bard of Scotland in your own real life home.  Perhaps you have always wanted to try haggis, but were put-off by the sheep organs that must be used as part of the traditional recipe.

It is a shame that the “Great chieftain o’ the puddin’ race” should be regarded (by some) with such a mixture of horror and humor. The vision of sheep’s stomachs and other intestines seems to send people running the other direction, but it has long been a traditional way of using up parts of the animal which otherwise might go to waste. Made properly, it is a tasty, wholesome dish, with every chef creating his or her own recipe to get the flavor and texture that suits them. Personally, I like a haggis which is spicy from pepper and herbs, with a lingering flavor on the palate after it has been consumed.

Finding a butcher who can supply sheep’s heart, lungs and liver may not be easy although nowadays beef bung (intestine) is often used instead of sheep’s stomach.

Enjoy!

Traditional Scottish Haggis

Ingredients:

  • Set of sheep’s heart, lungs and liver (cleaned by a butcher)
  • One beef bung
  • 3 cups finely chopped suet
  • One cup medium ground oatmeal
  • Two medium onions, finely chopped
  • One cup beef stock
  • One teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon pepper
  • One teaspoon nutmeg
  • ½ teaspoon mace

Method:

Trim off any excess fat and sinew from the sheep’s intestine and, if present, discard the windpipe. Place in a large pan, cover with water and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for an hour or possibly longer to ensure that they are all tender. Drain and cool.

Some chefs toast the oatmeal in an oven until it is thoroughly dried out (but not browned or burnt!)

Finely chop the meat and combine in a large bowl with the suet, oatmeal, finely chopped onions, beef stock, salt, pepper, nutmeg and mace. Make sure the ingredients are mixed well. Stuff the meat and spices mixture into the beef bung which should be over half full. Then press out the air and tie the open ends tightly with string. Make sure that you leave room for the mixture to expand or else it may burst while cooking. If it looks as though it may do that, prick with a sharp needle to reduce the pressure.

Place in a pot and cover with water. Bring to the boil and immediately reduce the heat and simmer, covered, for three hours. Avoid boiling vigorously to avoid bursting the skin.

Serve hot (and removed from casing) with “champit tatties and bashit neeps” (mashed/creamed potato and turnip). Some people like to pour a little whisky over their haggis – Drambuie is even better! Don’t go overboard on this or you’ll make the haggis cold.

Modern Haggis

*I located this recipe online at Suite101.  It seems quite a nice version of the traditional entree.

Ingredients:

  • 2 lbs. liver (almost any kind)
  • 3 onions
  • 1/4 lb beef suet
  • 2 cups oatmeal
  • Black pepper
  • Salt
  • Grains of Cayenne Pepper or Drops of Tabasco Sauce
  • 2 cups stock or broth

Instructions:

  1. Cook 2 pounds of liver with peeled onions for about 20 minutes
  2. Put the liver and onion through a chopper
  3. Chop suet
  4. Put oatmeal into a heavy frying pan and stir over fire until lightly toasted
  5. Add chopped liver, onions and suet
  6. Season to taste with salt and freshly ground black pepper
  7. Add few grains of cayenne pepper or couple of drops of Tabasco as desired
  8. Moisten with liquid in which liver and onions were cooked
  9. Put into a large heat-proof buttered bowl, filling a little more than half full
  10. Cover with greased paper, waxed paper or buttered aluminum foil
  11. Tie or press down foil securely
  12. Steam for about two hours or cook in pressure cooker under 15 pounds pressure for about 30 minutes

Serves eight. Takes between 90 minutes to three hours to prepare and cook depending upon method of cooking.

Source (Modern Haggis)

A Cook’s Tour of the Bayou Country, Episcopal Diocese of Louisiana (Southwest Deanery) including Trinity Episcopal Church in Morgan City, Louisiana. The cookbook includes Creole, Cajun, Southern, Wild Game and other regional food in addition to occasional international selections such as Haggis and Hungarian Goulash reflecting the diversity of the Gulf Coast.

Enjoy,

Eva

Editor’s Note: I’ve been living in Scotland going on 5 years, and I’m here to tell you that haggis is DELICIOUS. If you enjoy any kind of sausage, you’ve no business thumbing your nose at it – the meat (offal) in it is the same as your favourite salami! It is seasoned with pepper and barley, and cooked traditionally in the lining of a sheep’s stomach (again, a step above the intestine that most sausage is cooked in), but more often today you find them plastic casing. Either way, they are steamed, and the meat is scooped out and served on your plate – the casing is not consumed. So GET OVER IT and tuck in to some haggis!! – Rowan

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Filed under Beef, Dinner, Grains, Lamb, Meat, Scottish

Lamb & Couscous with Minted Yoghurt

So for my first recipe, just a little something I whipped up. I tend not to measure when I cook, I wing it a lot, so this recipe will be a bit conversational – more art than science.

Here is what you need:

  • Some lamb (I used lamb leg steaks, cut up into cubes)
  • Olive Oil
  • Lemon
  • Mint
  • Red wine
  • Honey
  • Garlic
  • Couscous
  • Raisins
  • Onion
  • Chicken stock cube (or a cup of chicken broth with another 1.5 cups water)
  • Greek yoghurt

Put your lamb into a bowl, and then sprinkle liberally with salt (I have sea salt in a grinder) and fresh cracked pepper, then add to marinate: about 2 tbs olive oil, juice of half a lemon, some chopped mint, and about a tablespoon or so of honey. Oh yeah, and chopped garlic!  Very important. And some red wine! Ok, let it sit at least 15 minutes (the longer the better, I say). Notice there is enough here for lots! You could use some for this dinner, then cook the rest tomorrow as kebabs. Or cook it all an enjoy leftovers for a while. Or invite friends!

Meanwhile, take some more mint,chop it up, and add it to about 1 1/2 cups of greek yoghurt with a quarter of lemon, salt and pepper. Set it aside.

When you are ready to cook your lamb, add some olive oil to a non-stick skillet (or, if you like, a nice cast-iron pan), and add half the onion. Sautee for a few minutes, then add the lamb, trying to hold back on the marinade (but reserve it!).  Simmer the lamb over medium high, but pour off any liquid (back into the marinade) that builds up. You want to sautee your lamb, not boil it.

Meanwhile…

In a pot with a tightfitting lid, sautee the rest of the onion in some olive oil, along with about a quarter cup of raisins (golden is preferred, but I used Sunmaid California and it was delicious!). Cook for a few minutes, then add 2 cups couscous and stir to coat. Add 2.5 cups water and a chicken stock cube (make sure it dissolves!). Bring to a boil, stir, cover, and remove from heat.

You’ve been watching your lamb, right? Is it getting nice and golden? Great! Pour the liquid back in, and let it simmer down til it caramelises, it should only take a minute or so. Serve the lamb over the couscous with a nice dollop of that yoghurt-mint sauce (which, btw, also makes a lovely dressing for a spinach & tomato salad).

Bon appétit!

Rowan

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Filed under Difficulty - Sous Chef, Dinner, Grains, Greek, Lamb, Mediterranean, Spring, Summer